S is for Sea

We all grew up hearing about the 7 Seas but there are many more than just the 7 from ancient times. There are also 5 ocean regions and within each ocean are many additional seas. Seas are also landlocked in many continents.

Did you know there is really no consensus on the definition of SEA? That’s what I read somewhere.

I thought I’d just list the seas around the world here but after looking into it, I think I’ll just pass you along to Wikipedia’s List of Seas.

Then I thought I’d do an story on everything SEA, like SEAweed, SEAgull etc. But, again, the list is long, so I’ll send you to another website for an exhaustive list of words that start with SEA. It includes words like seam (sea+m) but many others in the SEA theme I write about.

If you are a beachcomber you know several of our favorite SEA words: seashell, seashore, seaglass, seabean, seabird, seaweed, seahorse.

 

 

 

S is for Squid

Yum!

Squid is a favorite dish in my family. Trouble is we can’t find it often (except frozen prepared brands) where we currently live. But when we do eat it, we savor every bite.

  • Squid ink noodles
  • Calamari fried or sauteed
  • Squid Kebabs
  • Stuffed, grilled, in a stew
  • Salad

If you can find some good squid try this recipe:

PARMESAN-CRUSTED CALAMARI KEBABS

Calamari tubes, 1 pound cleaned

30 6-in skewers

½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

½ cup panko

½ tsp salt

½ tsp freshly ground pepper

1 large egg white, lightly beaten

Favorite sauce: we like using Ginger People ® Sweet Ginger Chili sauce or garlic-drawn butter

Slice tubes in half, lengthwise. Thread onto skewers. Combine cheese, EVOO, panko, salt and pepper into a shallow dish. Brush the squid lightly with egg white. Dredge squid into panko mixture. Place skewers on a lightly greased rack in a broiler pan. Broil calamari 5-6 inches from heat for 2-4 minutes or until golden brown. If using wooden skewers, watch carefully since they may burn.

Serve with your favorite sauce.

S is for Starfish

I love Starfish!!

They come in so many colors and sizes, are so incredibly strong and can regenerate limbs. How cool is that?

Here are 2 starfish stories…

ONE

When the boys were younger and we lived in Florida, we had a salt-water tank for their aquatic project with 4-H.  We could catch and raise several species of sea critters from the Gulf of Mexico and the Sarasota Bay, then release them back into the wild and catch some more. The kids seined in the Bay with other 4-H-ers for specimens.

 

The bottom of the tank consisted of small shells and sand and there were a few large pieces of rock and coral (found on the beach) for critters to hide by or in. Someone found a huge whelk shell with a hermit crab inside. This thing was big; about the size of my iPad. We decided to keep it for a little while and observe it. We also had a few urchins (2 types), snails, a crab and some other things. Later, one of the kids in the group found a starfish so we added it to the mix. After placing it in the tank we all got ready for our home-school club’s Christmas party and took off. Arriving home hours later, we found the starfish had been attacked.

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Sea Star missing 2 arms

It was missing two arms, one gone, the other sitting at the other end of the tank. Lucky for that starfish we lived close enough to the water to get it to safety. I can’t remember if we took it to the beach or put him in the canal across the street from our house. Starfish have interesting bodies which provide them protection from predators but they can break off their arms when threatened. Perhaps that’s what happened and the missing arm became dinner for someone in the tank.

TWO

One year, late in the season, we took a family trip to Apalachicola, FL for the weekend. A storm had passed through the days before which is always exciting for me because I love comb the beaches after a storm. The wave action brought on shore a ton of shells, sea cucumbers, horseshoe crabs and starfish.  I photographed a lot of them but my favorite was of a starfish. I have since used that one (an edited version) as my branding for CraftyBeachcomber on both the Facebook page and the Etsy store.

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CraftyBeachcomber

I love starfish!! What’s your favorite sea critter?

 

 

S is for Seahorse

4 FACTS ABOUT SEAHORSES

  1. The don’t have teeth. They don’t have stomachs. So seahorses eat their food whole and digest quickly.
  2. Females lay eggs in the male’s belly pouch. The eggs hatch after 45 days.
  3. There are more than 40 species of seahorses world-wide.
  4. Seahorses can’t swim very well, so they anchor themselves with their tails to sea grasses, coral, and anything else.design-43

S is for Shovel & Pail Set

What’s the one thing you have to take onto the beach with you? A shovel & pail set, of course.

Since early childhood, you learned you always need a shovel and pail to play in the sand. There have been some amazing sets available to children over the years from the metal set with cool art on the pail to designer plastic pails with decorative handled shovels.

Kids are fun to watch with their shovels and pails. They dig and dig and dig. They run to the water to fill the pail and then back to dump the water in the hole. Most of the time the water sinks into the sand but they keep running back for more water in  hopes to fill up the hole one day.

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Creative Commons

My boys, growing up on the beach, had shovels of all sizes. There were some that broke easily, others that never broke but ended up at friends houses so we just bought more. Short handles, long handles and some with long wooden handles; we still have these.

With a long-handled shovel you can conquer the world or dig a hole for your brother to fall into head first:

Shovels and pails are necessary tools for sand castle building. There are fancy tools and molds you can buy but the classic sand castle is built using a shovel and pail.

So next time you go to the beach don’t forget your shovel and pail.

S is for shovel and pail set.

 

S is for Surf

Surf: n. a swell at sea that breaks on shore; v. to ride a wave toward the shore on a board.

You can also surf (search) the internet but that doesn’t apply to this post.

How many of you love to watch the waves at the beach or on a coastline? I do, it is pretty relaxing regardless of the size of the waves. A rough weather day can cause some great swells at the beach and for me it is just as fun to watch the angry waves crash as it is to engage my vie on the small cresting of a swell over sandbar.

I don’t surf. I think my dad did. And his brother, my late uncle, surfed. He’s in the Ocean City MD Surfing Hall of Fame. Yay, Uncle Chuck.  My husband has taken surfing instruction. He did really well and got to ride a super wave in Hawaii before diving off the board. It was so fun to watch him.hawaii-e-041

While in Hawaii, my husband and I had the great opportunity to watch a surfing competition. We just came upon it one day as we were just touring around Oahu. It was Van’s World Cup of Surfing November 2012. The perspective of being there to see it live is so different from watching it on TV or on a Facebook video post. The waves were so immense and my adrenaline was in a rush as I watched the surfers tackling their Goliath. It was just amazing and I’ll always remember the experience of viewing a surfing competition in Hawaii in person.

Back to the Lower 48, since I was a kid I’ve experienced watching surfers tackling waves, but much smaller ones. I marvel at the people that have the strength to battle rough swells to catch a wave before the beach is closed due to the storm.  Surfing requires a lot of muscle, balance and stamina.  It takes practice.

If you have a surfing story to share  please comment below.

S is for surf.